Trust: Why It Matters Most to Business Growth

Lately there have been some questionable business practices exposed by the media.  Regardless of the size of the organization, one point is obvious—these companies will have a hard time, if ever, of shaking their reputations as scoundrels.

They have broken the sacred trust bond.

Charles Green, in his book Trust-Based Selling has an equation that we find is a powerful reminder to our clients of the power of trust:

TQ = C + R + I / S

The trust quotient = the level of credibility + reliability + intimacy divided by self-orientation.

Let’s start with the denominator.  Recalll your days of school algebra.  If the bottom number is high, the end result will be smaller.  So, the first important factor is minimizing the “me” orientation of many salespeople.

You need to build a relationship.  If you were out on a date with someone who droned on about themselves, you likely would not go out again.  It is a one-way interaction.  Successful relationships must be two-way and, in the best of these, each party carefully listens to the other to see how they can help each other and give.  Business growth—for you and them—depends on this exchange.

Credibility and reliability are gained by what you ask, your experience and how responsive you are with your actions.  Some of this is hard data.  The final piece, intimacy, is important, reflecting how you share and open yourself up to the person, offering assistance to the new acquaintance and others.  In today’s more transparent environment, it is easier to get a sense of how someone interacts.  Doing a quick search can put information at your fingertips to answer some questions.  Is this person:

  • Too self-promotional?
  • Overly critical?
  • Collaborative?
  • Actively offering advice and insights?

In addition, there are always ways, such as LinkedIn, to determine who knows your contact and do a quick check of credentials, etc.

I would go so far as to say that the TQ equation points to value, which is a key component of trust.  (Value is the subject of a future blog.)  In every instance, where there is someone I trust, it is the result of their providing value to me in one way or another during the developing stages of our relationship.  They assisted me and I them.

People trust those who have gone out of their way to help.  It’s the giving principle.  Trust and value are inextricably linked.  It is in the process of articulating value and developing mutual respect in a relationship that trust is enhanced.

In a previous blog on negotiating, we raised a question in a LinkedIn group:  How well are you articulating value and building trust before negotiating on price?  One response, from Steven Forth, CEO of LeveragePoint Innovations, Inc., said, “I think articulating value, which shows an understanding of your customer’s business, is a good way to build trust.” 

It’s also good for business growth.

How do you give and add value?  What have you done to improve your TQ?

You can subscribe to the Good Growth blog, join our LinkedIn group, Sales Effectiveness (http://linkd.in/ql6C81), and follow Opus Partners’ company page on LinkedIn (http://linkd.in/ozpa8K).  We’re also on Twitter (@GoodGrowth) and have an Opus Partners Fan Page on Facebook (http://on.fb.me/qAFrPj). 


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